Student Denied School Lunch Because Colored Hair Was “Too Nappy”

Published On March 15, 2017 | By patrice | The latest posts

Jaylon Sewell is said to be a good boy. The 16-year-old student is described to be very bright, an active youth leader at his local church, and with his busy schedule, he also makes time as the manager for his high school’s football team at Neville High School in Monroe, Louisiana.

However, Sewell has recently found himself in the midst of controversy after choosing to live a little and color the top of his hair blonde as a fashion statement paying homage to NFL baller Odell Beckham Jr., a wide receiver for the New York Giants.

The high schooler’s family took action with the decision to file a formal complaint back in November with the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, alleging that Sewell was discriminated against because he was told that he couldn’t attend class or eat in the cafeteria due to staff’s dislike of his hair—even  though “white students with dyed hair were allowed to attend class.”

Jaylon, as well as more than 20 other African American students, were repeatedly targeted and harassed by administrative staff for their choice of hairstyle – including the style that identifies with Beckham, any other colored styles, braids, dreads  and even hair that was deemed as “too nappy” by administrators, according to his family.

Additionally, the Sewell family claimed in their complaint that the school district retaliated against Jaylon by choosing to “suspend him, attempting to expel him, and barring him from participation on the NHS football team.”

According to the Monroe City Schools dress code, “Hair styles, and hair dyed outlandish colors which cause a disruption to the educational process shall not be allowed.”

A Louisville, Kentucky high school recently made headlines after they’d banned natural black hairstyles and even began to threaten students with suspension if they wore dreads, braids and twists. This seemed to make up a large percentage of the students that attended that particular high school. Parents fought against the staff and the dress code was soon changed.

Many young black scholars currently wear these hairstyles and it is unfair that whites don’t get picked on in the same capacity about their choice of hairstyles.

So, what are your thoughts on this news? Comment below and share your opinion.

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