How the government murdered Dr Martin Luther King: Here are closing arguments

Published On January 19, 2015 | By Admin | Black Power 60s, Politics, The latest posts, Uncategorized, video

by Dr Boyce Watkins

Many people don’t know how Dr. Martin Luther King Jr died, at least not exactly. But what you should know is that he wasn’t killed by one deranged lone gunman, as your history teacher might have said. He was killed as part of a vast government conspiracy.

This was established during a trial in 1999, which didn’t receive much publicity. We went and gathered the closing arguments for the trial, presented by Dr. William F. Pepper in a Memphis courtroom. The arguments will help all of us to gain a deeper understanding of why this iconic leader was taken away from us at such an early age.

Black collective action was long considered a threat to national security by the federal government. Not only were key leaders assassinated, but major organizations were consistently infiltrated, with many so-called black leaders serving as FBI informants and others living under extreme government surveillance. The deaths of Dr. King and Malcolm X led to a period we refer to as the “Dark Ages for Black People,” in which education and jobs were taken out of inner city communities, and replaced with drugs, guns, broken families, addiction, abuse and long prison sentences. Some even say that the music young people listen to are part of a consistent propaganda effort to control the minds of African American youth.

As you can see around you, our community has yet to recover: Black wealth has remained stagnant, violence is rampant in many cities, black unemployment is very high, and most black families do not have a father in the household. This is not an accident. Be sure to watch all four videos below. It will teach you a thing or two about what Dr. King was really all about and how his legacy has been consistently tainted.


Closing arguments from Dr. King conspiracy trial – Part I


Closing arguments Part II


Closing arguments Part III


Closing arguments Part IV

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